Family and friends have cheered home their loved ones aboard a Royal Navy destroyer as she returned to base after carrying out patrols in the Middle East.

HMS Daring, with her 260 crew on board, returned to Portsmouth Naval Base following the nine-month deployment.

HMS Daring

During her mission to provide security to shipping, the £1 billion destroyer visited 12 countries, travelled 50,000 miles and undertook 20 patrols of the Ban-al-Mandeb strait. Commander Marcus Hember, Daring's commanding officer, said:

"After nine demanding months at sea conducting operations to protect Britain's economy, returning home is a wonderful and rewarding moment for all of Daring's sailors and their families."

"I am proud of everything they have achieved during this long deployment and hope they enjoy some well-earned time with their families and loved ones.

"Everybody on board has contributed to the security and stability of one of the most important areas of the world for international trade, something [for] which they truly deserve recognition.  

HMS Daring homecoming

The warship left Portsmouth last September with a Royal Marines boarding team on board and a detachment from Yeovilton-based 825 Naval Air Squadron.

Able Seaman Jake Hobday, the ship's youngest crew member aged 19, said: "The deployment has been long but I've learned loads and been to places in the world I never thought I would see.  

HMS Daring homecoming

Natalie Moylan, who was meeting husband Leading Hand Johnathan Moylan, from Gosport, Hampshire, said:

"It gets a bit emotional when he returns and it's good to have him back... until he messes up the place again."

Nicky Nelson, who welcomed home husband Chief Petty Officer Robert Nelson, said: "It's lovely to have him home and to have a bit of peace and quiet with the kids, it's quite hard when he's away for a long time."  

HMS Daring homecoming